Highway 1 – Trans Canada Highway

The Trans-Canada Highway between Victoria British Columbia and St. John's, Newfoundland, joins all ten provinces of Canada and is the world's longest national highway with a length of 7,821 km. The British Columbia portion of the highway runs along the path of the Canadian Pacific Railway, through the Thompson Nicola Regional District to the Port of Vancouver

Highway 5

Highway 5 is a north-south route in southern British Columbia, Canada. It connects the southern Trans-Canada route (Highway 1) with the northern Yellowhead route (Highway 16), providing the shortest land connection between Vancouver and Edmonton. It is 524 km in length. The portion of Highway 5 south of Kamloops is known as the Coquihalla Highway, while its northern portion is known as the Southern Yellowhead Highway.

The Coquihalla Highway has created greater access to the interior, cutting travel time to Vancouver by almost two hours while facilitating commuter traffic to and from Kamloops. The result has been increased building activity in the area that has continued for more than a decade.

Highway 5 begins in the south at its junction with Highway 3 at an uninhabited location known as Othello, 7 km east of Hope. The exit numbers on the Coquihalla are a continuation of those on Highway 1 west of Hope. 35 km north of Othello, after passing through five interchanges, Highway 5 reaches the Great Bear snow shed, which is a landmark on the route. Speed limit is 110 km/hr from Hope to Merritt. 61 km and five interchanges later, the Coquihalla enters the city of Merritt at its south junction with Highway 5A and Highway 97C.

Highway 5 then goes 4 km through the eastern area of Merritt before reaching its northern junction with Highway 5A. The Coquihalla has three more interchanges and one mountain pass, the Surrey Lake Summit, in its remaining 72 km between Merritt and its end at a junction with Highways 1 and 97 within the Afton area of Kamloops. Highway 5 continues east for 7 km concurrent with Highways 1 and 97 through Kamloops. This stretch of road, which carries 97 South and 5 North on the same lanes (and vice versa), is the only wrong-way concurrency in British Columbia.

After separating from Highways 1 and 97, Highway 5 proceeds north for approximately 19 km, temporarily leaving Kamloops city limits as a four-lane highway, before re-entering the city at the Rayleigh community and continuing north. It becomes a two-lane highway at Heffley Creek and the exit to Sun Peaks resorts, both of which indicate the final northern boundary of Kamloops.

Highway 5 follows the North Thompson River north from Heffley Creek for approximately 54 km, along a parallel course with a branch of the Canadian National Railway, passing through Barriere, to a junction with Highway 24 at Little Fort. 30 km north of Little Fort, while continuing to follow the North Thompson and the CN Railway, Highway 5 reaches the community of Clearwater. It proceeds northeast for another 107 km, passing Vavenby en route, to the community of Blue River, and then 109 km further north through the Columbia Mountains, passing by the community of Valemount to its northern terminus at Tête Jaune Cache, where it meets Highway 16.

Highway 97 – Okanagan Highway

Highway 97 is the longest continuously-numbered route in British Columbia , and the longest provincial highway in Canada, running 2,081 km from the Canada/U.S. border at Osoyoos in the south to the British Columbia/Yukon border in the north at Watson Lake, Yukon.

The Cariboo Highway section of Highway 97, between Cache Creek and Prince George, is 441 km in length and is named for the Cariboo region, through which it travels. The Cariboo Highway designation begins at Cache Creek, veering north for 11 km to its junction with Highway 99. North of Highway 99, Highway 97 travels 92 km through Clinton and 70 Mile House, where the British Columbia Railway begins to roughly parallel Highway 97.

The Okanagan Highway is a 269 km section of Highway 97 between the international border and Monte Creek on the Trans-Canada Highway. It is named for the Okanagan region of British Columbia, through which it largely passes. It begins in the south at the international border crossing north of Oroville, and travels 4 km north to its junction with the Crowsnest Highway at Osoyoos. The highway travels north for 47 km, passing through the Testalinden Creek Landslide and the communities of Oliver and Okanagan Falls. From Okanagan Falls, Highway 97 runs near the western shore of Skaha Lake before arriving at the locality of Kaleden, where Highway 3A diverges west.

13 km north of Kaleden, Highway 97 arrives at the city of Penticton. North of Penticton, Highway 97 follows the western shore of Okanagan Lake for 45 km, through the communities of Summerland and Peachland, before reaching its junction with Highway 97C just south of Westbank. From there, Highway 97 passes through West Kelowna, Westbank, Lakeview, and reserve lands belonging to the Westbank First Nation until, 15 km northeast of the 97C junction, Highway 97 begins to cross Okanagan Lake via the William R. Bennett Bridge. The highway enters the city of Kelowna upon landfall on the east shore of the lake. 6 km east into the city centre, the highway reaches its junction with Highway 33.

Four kilometres north of the Highway 33 junction, Highway 97 leaves the urbanized area of Kelowna. For the next 43 km, the route travels well east of Okanagan Lake, passing through the community of Winfield, then alongside the west shore of Wood Lake to Oyama. Both of these communities lie within the municipality of Lake Country. Highway 97 then passes along the west shore of Kalamalka Lake before entering the city of Vernon and a junction with Highway 6. The highway then travels north for 10 km to a junction with Highway 97A at Swan Lake, at which point it veers northwest. The highway continues for another 81 km, past the town of Falkland, before it merges onto the Trans-Canada Highway at Monte Creek, following Highway 1 for 105 km west to Cache Creek. As it travels westward, Highways 1 and 97 parallel the Thompson River, passing through the city of Kamloops, where the two highways intersect with Highways 5 and 5A.

Highway 97 – Cariboo Highway

Highway 97 is the longest continuously-numbered route in British Columbia , and the longest provincial highway in Canada, running 2,081 km from the Canada/U.S. border at Osoyoos in the south to the British Columbia/Yukon border in the north at Watson Lake, Yukon.

The Cariboo Highway section of Highway 97, between Cache Creek and Prince George, is 441 km in length and is named for the Cariboo region, through which it travels. The Cariboo Highway designation begins at Cache Creek, veering north for 11 km to its junction with Highway 99. North of Highway 99, Highway 97 travels 92 km through Clinton and 70 Mile House, where the British Columbia Railway begins to roughly parallel Highway 97.